Trails from the Rails 5: Arisaig to Morar

  • Area: Ross-shire
  • Local Train Operators: Scotrail
  • Length: About 6½ miles
  • Points of Note: Silver Sands of Morar
  • OS maps – Explorer 398 (1:25,000); Landranger 40 (1:50,000)

This walk is not perfect from a technical perspective, as it is entirely on-road. However, the road was bypassed many years ago so traffic is now pleasingly light. This allows an easy stroll over rolling Scottish coastal hillocks from Britain’s most westerly railway station to one of the nation’s most beautiful beaches.

___…___

There is not much to say about Arisaig station except that it is Britain’s most westerly station. The Government subsidy for the West Highland extension, the last railway in Britain to open up a new area to communications, did not run to such things as architects.

Arisaig 1 JPG.jpg

The budget has also not run to station or signalling staff for some years; the signal box is retained for largely decorative purposes and the line is controlled by radio from a cabin near Fort William.

Drop out of the station and cross the A830 (surprisingly busy considering it doesn’t actually go anywhere). Try to avoid being run over while distracted by the views across the village, down Loch nan Ceall and over to the Isle of Eigg (most heavily-populated of the Small Isles and accessible by ferry from Mallaig).

Arisaig towards Eigg 1 JPG.jpg

Having dropped down from the A830 to the main lane through the village, take the first right and follow the lane back out of town again. At the crossroads (or what ought to be a crossroads) go straight on, rising up past the church and the school to cross over Keppoch and peak at the walk’s summit – 48 metres above sea level.

Ahead, as the road drops away to cross the marshes below Loch Morar, can be seen the other end of Eigg and the bulky form of Rum. The notice, on what used to be the A830 and therefore the “Road to the Isles” until the bypass went in, is typical of road signs in these parts.

Eigg & Rum 1 JPG.jpg

At the bottom of the hill turn left and then follow the B8008 as it turns right and works across the bottom of Mointeach Mhor, with views of the bypass cutting up the hills on the other side (left of picture). This has an air of being the old way out of Loch Morar – Britain’s deepest body of freshwater (only beaten for Britain’s overall deepest body of water by the Inner Sound between Skye and Applecross, north of Kyle of Lochalsh). It is very wide and boggy, and mostly barely above sea level. The loch is at the eastern end, leading into it in a manner that suggests the loch should simply flow out into the sea through this gully. Actually it makes no above-ground contribution to the watercourse at all.

Mointeach Mhor 1 JPG.jpg

The road continues along the coastline, amongst grubby sandy beaches, wooded hillocks and golf courses.

Lon Liath 1 JPG

After passing Traigh House the landscape becomes slightly more varied and there are some gradients to work over, though nothing very hefty. Glenancross is situated in a small valley, making a sort of mini-Scotland that seems out of scale, beneath the not exactly towering 88-metre height of Beinn an Achaidh Mhoir.

Glenancross 1 JPG.jpg

The road then turns right and negotiates the flanks of this little Beinn before dropping down into the highlight of the walk – Morar Bay. To the north can be seen the village of Morar, its little local Sgurr and, hulking on the skyline, the rather larger Sgurr Eireagoraidh. On this side of Morar Bay is the first hint of Morar’s silver sands.

Morar Bay 1 JPG.jpg

In due course the road drops down to them, providing easy access onto this wooded silvery shore.

Morar Sands 3 JPG.jpg

A diversion up the beach beside the clear blue water will more than repay the small effort involved, and procure more photos for friends to claim were actually taken in Cuba.

Morar Sands 4 JPG.jpg

Morar Bay 2 JPG.jpg

After finishing with the beach, return to the road and turn left up the hill. This leads up to the junction with the A830, where its new incarnation crosses the old alignment at a different level and with provision of a generous subway. At the other end of this subway the path weaves back down to the old road, which resumes its meandering course under the title of B8008. In this form it comes to the River Morar – a short waterway which links Loch Morar with Morar Bay by means of a scenic gorge. Over this gorge is a scenic one-piece concrete viaduct, carrying the railway into Morar. Its arches have a certain disconcerting effect of throwing the sound of a rushing river to somewhere about ten feet above the railway. Stopping in the narrow, lightly-used roadway to admire the shuttering work on the concrete will invoke Sod’s Law.

Morar Viaduct 1 JPG.jpg

After passing under the railway, turn right off the B8008 and follow the river. This rapidly leads up to the shores of Loch Morar, firstly offering views of pleasant churches snug beneath the hills and then, of course, views up the loch itself. (But not far up, as the west end of the loch is scattered with islands and some walking is needed to get past them all.)

Morar Church 1 JPG.jpg

Loch Morar 2 JPG.jpg

The loch can be followed for some miles up the north shore – first on a surfaced lane and later on a narrow, wending footpath. This is very much a no-through road; the path eventually climbs over a mini-pass, somewhat short of the top of the loch, and ends on the shores of a sea loch at Tarbert. Short of catching the ferry back to Mallaig (and it only calls by prior booking) the only way back is to walk 9 miles home again.

Otherwise turn left just before the church and rise up another back lane to come out onto the B8008 again. Turn right and proceed for a few hundred yards to reach Morar station.

Morar 2 JPG.jpg

The line is served by four trains each way daily (three of which are through trains to/ from Glasgow Queen Street) except on Sundays, where the service is somewhat reduced. In summer these are augmented by limited-stop “Jacobite” steam services from Fort William, for which special fares apply. Morar is not one of the places served by this service.

One place which is served by the Jacobite is Glenfinnan, where Bonnie Prince Charlie rose his standard (he would later be seen in this area being carried over the sea to Skye after Culloden) and now home of the famous viaduct. The viaduct has featured in the Harry Potter films. This leads to the obvious amusing speculation that the Hogsmeade branch, serving the castle itself, diverges somewhere between Glenfinnan and Mallaig. A most reasonable candidate for the location of Hogwarts, therefore, taking one thing with another, particularly bearing in mind total isolation, presence of ruins on the map and the handiness of a nice big body of water reputed to contain a monster, would be the upper end of Loch Morar.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s