Trails from the Rails 10: Luxulyan to St Austell

  • Area: Cornwall
  • Local Train Operators: Great Western Railway, Cross Country
  • Length: About 10 miles
  • Points of Note: Luxulyan Valley, Par Harbour, the Cornish coast, docks at Charlestown
  • OS maps – Explorer 107 (1:25,000); Landranger 200 (1:50,000)

This is a simple and attractive walk, mixing level walking, uphill and downhill sections, woods, industrial ruins and coastal views before ending up pottering through suburban St Austell.

It is also particularly a “trail by the rails”. It is never much more than half a mile from a railway.

___…___

Luxulyan station, the first stop on the Newquay branch since the closure of the station at St Blazey, is a neat little affair. It consists of a half-overgrown platform set on the central Cornish plateau slightly down the hill from Luxulyan itself. Its one and pretty much only claim to fame came in 1991, when the shortest-ever High Speed Train formation to run in passenger service terminated here after a somewhat unscheduled journey from the other end of Luxulyan Tunnel. The power car at the other end of the train had derailed in an isolated location and this was the simplest way of ferrying the handful of customers back to somewhere with road access. Luxulyan remains proud of this sight.

The powercar involved has spent the ensuing years making other appearances in the media, including as the last powercar in British Rail’s Intercity livery, as the star feature (under a faked “43001” number) at a First Great Western relaunch and as the rear powercar in the Ufton Nervet incident, which gives her the dubious status of being the last UK rail vehicle to be returned to traffic after being involved in a fatal accident.

But to return to Luxulyan.

Luxulyan 1 JPG.jpg

On leaving the station and meeting the road, turn left up into the village and right at the top of the hill.

It is possible to do the first leg of the walk off-road (look at the OS map for details), but it is usually extremely muddy and involves disturbing the peaceful repose of several engaging native species of bramble, so instead follow the road down the hill out of the village and turn right at the bottom by Gatty’s Bridge. Follow the back lane into the valley for about half a mile, then take the left onto the lane heading sharply up the hillside. Take the second footpath to the right and follow this as it makes a level heading along the hillside.

The first footpath offers similarly good views and a similarly level walk through the same peaceful woods, but the second path leads to Treffry’s Viaduct and is therefore worth the extra little pull. It is a twin-level viaduct, with a stream on the lower level and the course of the old tramroad on the top. A curious irony of this particular railway is that it replaced a tramroad that was better engineered than the railway.

The viaduct is built of solid granite and very, very impressive. Through the gaps between the blocks that make up the deck can be seen the stream flowing along its lower level. Underneath the arches, swinging around endless sharp curves at a pleasingly low speed, is the replacement railway. It is unlikely that there will actually be a train to be seen here, given the branch’s service level. At the western end the tramway heads into a sheer-sided cutting through the granite, complete with stream, on its way back to Luxulyan.

Luxulyan Viaduct 2 JPG.jpgLuxulyan Viaduct 1 JPG.jpg

Having admired the viaduct, return to the eastern side of the valley and continue walking away from Luxulyan along this high-level path, now accompanied by a stream and rather a lot of evidence that this used to be an upmarket tramway. This evidence includes most of the granite sleepers and several lengths of rail.

Luxulyan Valley 2 JPG.jpg

After two-thirds of a mile or so this opportunity for pleasant reverie, ambling along through the woods beside the silently bubbling stream, is brought to a rather abrupt end. The stream ceases to be peacefully bubbling and instead forms a waterfall off the end of a chute that drops it over an absent waterwheel. The tramway meanwhile takes up the course of a long-abandoned rope-worked incline, the winding house for which has tumbled down and returned to nature. (Or had its nicely-hewn granite building blocks recycled by environmentally-conscious locals, as the case may be.)

Luxulyan Valley 3 JPG.jpg

Follow the incline downhill, across the lower path (which returns to Luxulyan to the right and dead-ends at a gate to the left) and on beneath an unusual skew bridge to the bottom of the valley, where it emerges next to and slightly below the current railway.

Luxulyan Valley 4 JPG.jpg

Follow the path as it swings around the end of the hill and across a car park to the point where the tramway turns into railway. Until the early ’90s there was a china clay drying facility here, lightly served by this upgraded stub of the tramway route branching off the Newquay line. Now the stub is much overgrown and the path runs alongside as the rails rise to join the working railway.

The path dips and goes through a very small adit to pick up the hill side of the railway. It then runs alongside, separated from the running line by a stream, down to St Blazey.

There is nothing very notable about St Blazey as a place – the housing is fairly typical housing and the railway doesn’t get up to as much as it used to – but the stream runs through it in a green corridor so there is not too much need to attend to it. The first road is the A390 from Lostwitheil, Liskeard and Saltash, which crosses the railway on the level. Next to the crossing is the crossing keeper’s house, sandwiched between railway and stream and in private hands.

The path is now neatly gravelled as it runs down a fairly straight leg to the second level crossing. Here it is necessary to cross the railway, as on this side of the line the onward path plunges straight into St Blazey’s semi-moribund marshalling yard.

St Blazey crossing 1 JPG.jpg

Having crossed the railway, turn right (the first right, separated from the railway by a scrap of fence) and continue alongside a second stream that turns out to have been hiding on the other side of the railway (the railway losing no time in crossing the first stream, diving into the marshalling yard and vanishing behind a hedge). Follow this second stream down past the back of a wooded park. About halfway down the railway is crossed on the level as it curves sharply out of St Blazey yard and twirls up a 150-degree-or-so bend towards Par station. Continue to the end of this leg of the stream, where the path turns into a couple of dusty yards and a back alley before joining the A3082 to Fowey.

From here Par station is a left turn to pass under the railway and then another left turn on the other side to follow a gulley to the station forecourt. To continue to St Austell, turn right here instead and pass over the level crossing conveying the St Blazey Harbour branch (and former line to Fowey) across the A3082. This one retains not only its crossing keeper’s house but also a handsome set of classic crossing gates.

St Blazey crossing 2 JPG.jpg

Once over the railway, turn left and pass beneath the mainline on its low stone viaduct. The road promptly swings round to the right and a short, disagreeable bit of pavement-walking ensues, trapped between harbour boundary wall to the left, road to the right and Cornwall Mainline above.

After the harbour gateway the road dips to pass under the railway and the footpath diverges, running between railway and harbour before turning left to pass through the tail end of the harbour and clay dries complex.

St Blazey Harbour 1 JPG.jpg

The path runs down to the seashore and turns right, following the cliffs and a sign marked “South West Coast Path” along the edge of a golf course. This offers some rather good views back towards Gribbin Head:

Gribbin Head 1 JPG.jpg

On winter afternoons the sun also shimmers quite handsomely across the passing trains as they sweep round the curves on the climb towards St Austell:

Carlyon Bay Golf Course 1 JPG.jpg

Less pleasing were the views of the abandoned Coliseum on the beach at Carylon Bay. These ruins have now gone, thereby mildly improving the view.

Carylon Bay 1 JPG.jpg

Swing across the car park, sticking close to the cliffs, and rise around the coast side of the Carlyon Bay luxury hotel. The coast path runs across a grassy area and tries to avoid a spate of suburbia by going around the cliff side of several back gardens. These attempts are almost successful, though a brief stint on Sea Road admiring the houses is necessary.

Sea Road St Austell 1 JPG.jpg

But Sea Road is private, so no time is lost dropping off it again and running round the back of some more houses before falling down the hillside to Charlestown’s little harbour. Slightly unexpectedly, this will usually be occupied by a classic ship or two.

Charlestown 1 JPG.jpg

Work around the docks and pick up the main road towards St Austell, leading directly up the hill from the left-hand dock. This is long, fairly straight and steadily climbing in a way that, for all of the mixed architecture, has been a bore for a bit when it finally passes the Penrice Academy and hits the A390 on the fringes of suburban St Austell.

Pass straight across the roundabout and follow the pavement into town. This is a classic Cornish suburban road which, apart from the car designs and traffic levels, has not changed much in forty or fifty years. The telegraph lines have a pleasingly cluttered air. At the bottom of a dip a slightly staggered crossroads is handled by a pair of mini-roundabouts, where Victoria Road emerges as Alexandra Road.

Alexandra Road is followed for barely a quarter of a mile up the hill to a discreet, carefully-signposted gulley off to the right. This leads up between a couple of garden walls to the railway and then follows the same to a footbridge over the three tracks of the mainline. The overgrown third line, swinging sharply away to a buffer stop, is the former access to St Austell’s goods yard. Cross the bridge and continue along the path, now on the other side of the railway but still following it with much the same dedication, to the road.

The railway station is straight ahead; trains to Par and Plymouth are down the road ahead and across the old yard, while trains to Truro and Plymouth are better reached by crossing the railway by the road bridge and running down the pavement to the station forecourt. The forecourt is strikingly built-up on the steep hillside above the town and provides a rare bit of level open space for the bus station.

St Austell 1 JPG.jpg

Long a beautifully-preserved harmonious mid-19th-century/ early-20th-century wayside mainline timber station, St Austell has been not wholly sympathetically renovated in the 21st century. In 1999 the Down platform building was flattened and replaced by a building that in other circumstances might have seemed modern and vibrant instead of severely out of keeping – such as if the opportunity had been taken to remove the subsequently-derelict Up platform building (replacing it with something that matched the new Down building) and the old signalbox (closed 1980, which looked in keeping with the old station and now doesn’t). A new footbridge, appearing high enough to be future-proofed for electrification west of Plymouth (stop laughing), took so long to appear that styles have moved on so it doesn’t really match the new building.

On the other hand, the station is still here and is moderately looked after.

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